It’s what FeaBee is looking forward to this coming Winter. <3

It’s what FeaBee is looking forward to this coming Winter. <3

oldrags:

Rainbow fairy costume fromOnce Upon a Time, 2011-12, FIDM Museum &amp; Galleries
Once Upon a Time’s costume designer Eduardo Castro and assistant costume designer Monique McRay have been nominated for the 2012 Emmy for Outstanding Costume Design.  I don’t watch the show, so I don’t know if this costume was from this year or last year.  It’s very unique, though.
I’ll put this under the “movie” tag because I don’t have a tag for TV.
Here’s a sketch for what appears to be another rainbow fairy:

oldrags:

Rainbow fairy costume fromOnce Upon a Time, 2011-12, FIDM Museum & Galleries

Once Upon a Time’s costume designer Eduardo Castro and assistant costume designer Monique McRay have been nominated for the 2012 Emmy for Outstanding Costume Design.  I don’t watch the show, so I don’t know if this costume was from this year or last year.  It’s very unique, though.

I’ll put this under the “movie” tag because I don’t have a tag for TV.

Here’s a sketch for what appears to be another rainbow fairy:

oldrags:

REBLOG BECAUSE IT&#8217;S BEAUTIFUL!!
Evening dress by Madeleine “Madame” Vionnet, 1936-38 France, FIDM Museum &amp; Galleries

French couturier Madeleine Vionnet was born on [June 22] in 1876. Born in Chilleurs-aux-Bois, about 75 miles from Paris, Vionnet was apprenticed to a local dressmaker at age 11. She spent several years in this first apprenticeship, moving to a small design house in Paris when she was 17. She later worked in London for several years, returning to Paris by 1901, where she worked first for Callot Soeurs and later for Doucet. In 1912, Vionnet opened her own salon, but closed the business at the beginning of World War I in 1914. After spending the war years in Italy, Vionnet returned to Paris and re-opened her couture house in 1918.
Though Vionnet began her training in the late 19th century, when artifice and decoration were the foundations of fashion, she developed a startlingly modern, deceptively simple approach to design. Many of her garments were based on simple geometric forms; square, circle or rectangle. The bias cut was integral to her work, and largely eliminated the need for shaping darts. Vionnet disliked corsets, and designed her garments to be worn without this confining undergarment. House models were encouraged to go without undergarments during fittings.
Vionnet’s primary concern was the form of a garment and how the garment related to the body. Working on her legendary wooden mannequin, Vionnet draped, cut, and slashed plain muslin toiles until a satisfactory design emerged. A suitable textile was chosen only after the design was complete. Vionnet herself tended towards neutrals, as she acknowledged in a 1937 interview: “I like black and white. They are pure color. Next to them, I like natural colors like the blue and green of eyes and red of lips.”1 In lieu of color, Vionnet often created textural contrasts by using different sides of the same fabric, or by pairing different textures in the same garment. If a patterned or brightly colored textile appeared in a Vionnet design, it was probably selected by Marcelle Chaumont, the premiѐre of Vionnet’s atelier. Chaumont’s color sense mediated Vionnet’s taste for neutrals.
Though Vionnet may have been most concerned with form, many of her garments feature sophisticated, carefully placed embellishment. Aware that her creative strength was in dressmaking, not surface design, Vionnet hired designers to create patterns for textile and surface decoration. From 1919 to 1925, she worked closely with Thayaht. In addition to creating surface designs for Vionnet, he illustrated her garments for the French fashion journal La Gazette du Bon Ton. In 1918, Vionnet hired Marie-Louise Favot. A dressmaker and trained artist, Favot (nicknamed Yo because Vionnet already employed another Marie-Louise) designed all of Vionnet’s embroidery motifs. Though the motifs were designed in-house, the actual work was contracted out to Michonet, a Parisian embroidery firm founded in 1858. Because so many of Vionnet’s designs were cut on the bias, innovative techniques were used to apply surface decoration. For example, embroidery stitches were angled to follow the grain of the bias-cut fabric so as not to interfere with the drape.
Yo worked particularly closely with one Michonet embroiderer, Albert Lesage. (Hopefully this name rings a bell!) Lesage purchased Michonet in 1922, changing the name of the firm to Lesage. Soon afterwards, Albert Lesage and Yo were married. Their son, Francois Lesage, ran the house from 1949 until he passed away in December 2011. Today, the firm produces both private commissions and designs for ready-to-wear and haute couture.
Given what we know about Vionnet’s atelier, Yo probably designed the bodice embroidery, which was then executed by Lesage’s embroiders. The chiffon foundation is embroidered with silk and metallic thread in a pattern of twining vines and flowers, accented with rhinestones and glass cabochons. Looking beyond the lovely surface embellishment, Vionnet’s construction techniques are evident in the unstructured bodice. Instead of using bust darts for shaping, the fabric is gathered and twisted around the neck; this technique pulls the fabric close to the body, ensuring a close fit without the use of darts. The wearer’s back is left nearly bare, accented by embroidered straps. A cummerbund wraps around the waist, compressing the excess chiffon into soft gathers.

oldrags:

REBLOG BECAUSE IT’S BEAUTIFUL!!

Evening dress by Madeleine “Madame” Vionnet, 1936-38 France, FIDM Museum & Galleries

French couturier Madeleine Vionnet was born on [June 22] in 1876. Born in Chilleurs-aux-Bois, about 75 miles from Paris, Vionnet was apprenticed to a local dressmaker at age 11. She spent several years in this first apprenticeship, moving to a small design house in Paris when she was 17. She later worked in London for several years, returning to Paris by 1901, where she worked first for Callot Soeurs and later for Doucet. In 1912, Vionnet opened her own salon, but closed the business at the beginning of World War I in 1914. After spending the war years in Italy, Vionnet returned to Paris and re-opened her couture house in 1918.

Though Vionnet began her training in the late 19th century, when artifice and decoration were the foundations of fashion, she developed a startlingly modern, deceptively simple approach to design. Many of her garments were based on simple geometric forms; square, circle or rectangle. The bias cut was integral to her work, and largely eliminated the need for shaping darts. Vionnet disliked corsets, and designed her garments to be worn without this confining undergarment. House models were encouraged to go without undergarments during fittings.

Vionnet’s primary concern was the form of a garment and how the garment related to the body. Working on her legendary wooden mannequin, Vionnet draped, cut, and slashed plain muslin toiles until a satisfactory design emerged. A suitable textile was chosen only after the design was complete. Vionnet herself tended towards neutrals, as she acknowledged in a 1937 interview: “I like black and white. They are pure color. Next to them, I like natural colors like the blue and green of eyes and red of lips.”1 In lieu of color, Vionnet often created textural contrasts by using different sides of the same fabric, or by pairing different textures in the same garment. If a patterned or brightly colored textile appeared in a Vionnet design, it was probably selected by Marcelle Chaumont, the premiѐre of Vionnet’s atelier. Chaumont’s color sense mediated Vionnet’s taste for neutrals.

Though Vionnet may have been most concerned with form, many of her garments feature sophisticated, carefully placed embellishment. Aware that her creative strength was in dressmaking, not surface design, Vionnet hired designers to create patterns for textile and surface decoration. From 1919 to 1925, she worked closely with Thayaht. In addition to creating surface designs for Vionnet, he illustrated her garments for the French fashion journal La Gazette du Bon Ton. In 1918, Vionnet hired Marie-Louise Favot. A dressmaker and trained artist, Favot (nicknamed Yo because Vionnet already employed another Marie-Louise) designed all of Vionnet’s embroidery motifs. Though the motifs were designed in-house, the actual work was contracted out to Michonet, a Parisian embroidery firm founded in 1858. Because so many of Vionnet’s designs were cut on the bias, innovative techniques were used to apply surface decoration. For example, embroidery stitches were angled to follow the grain of the bias-cut fabric so as not to interfere with the drape.

Yo worked particularly closely with one Michonet embroiderer, Albert Lesage. (Hopefully this name rings a bell!) Lesage purchased Michonet in 1922, changing the name of the firm to Lesage. Soon afterwards, Albert Lesage and Yo were married. Their son, Francois Lesage, ran the house from 1949 until he passed away in December 2011. Today, the firm produces both private commissions and designs for ready-to-wear and haute couture.

Given what we know about Vionnet’s atelier, Yo probably designed the bodice embroidery, which was then executed by Lesage’s embroiders. The chiffon foundation is embroidered with silk and metallic thread in a pattern of twining vines and flowers, accented with rhinestones and glass cabochons. Looking beyond the lovely surface embellishment, Vionnet’s construction techniques are evident in the unstructured bodice. Instead of using bust darts for shaping, the fabric is gathered and twisted around the neck; this technique pulls the fabric close to the body, ensuring a close fit without the use of darts. The wearer’s back is left nearly bare, accented by embroidered straps. A cummerbund wraps around the waist, compressing the excess chiffon into soft gathers.

// "Feral" Cats - Part 1: FeaBee//

*(This all started in a place that was referred to as a Project. In a town in Connecticut. My Mother lived there for about 5 years. I wasn’t living with her until I was a few weeks shy of turning 15.)

   I have always been a huge lover of animals. Especially with Cats. I loved domestic cats as well as “feral”/stray cats and still do to this day. I always had a soft spot for Strays. My heart strings were instantly pulled at the site of a cat who was skinny and clearly not taken care of and unhealthy. Even towards those cats which have run away from me, terrified.

Growing from kid to teenager, my love of the Feline grew. I would “take care” of Stray cats. I would feed them with cat food that came from a bag that was for our cats that we (my family) had. And despite always getting in trouble by my Mother for feeding them I would feed the strays anyway. And if any ran from me, I would place an empty butter container full of cat food in a well hidden spot for them were they would feel safe to eat. I even treated the more, less afraid, cats, if they had wounds. I could never help myself and always wanted to help any cat I saw that was clearly uncared for.

I became very attached to this one cat in particular. A beautiful, Tortoise Shell, female cat, who was a stray in the area I would go to to visit my Mother. (And there were many strays.) She wasn’t quite afraid of me, which makes me think, even now, that she was either abandoned there, in that place, or was dropped off… meaning she had human contact from early on in her life. She, was my favorite amongst all the strays there. When I officially moved there with my Mother, at age, 15, even after months of not seeing me, she remembered who I was. And would come visit me everyday. Of course, I was a food and water source for her but, even after she had her fill of food, she’d stick around a while longer to get some pets and rubs. She would stay on my porch even after I went back inside. She would watch the door, waiting for me to come out again. She would wait in the treeline by the woods for me to come home from school, or where ever I had been. Not soon after only 4-6 years of her being a stray there, and me calling her, Precious, I finally gave her, her permanent name. FeaBee. (Phoebe)  She became very special to me and not soon after I had moved in with my Mother, I wanted to adopt her. 

  But every time I would ask my Mother, she would say no. We already had too many cats, which was true. When we moved into another apartment building in the “project” do to construction that was being done, I went looking for FeaBee the day we moved into the new apartment. And I had her follow me to the new place we were at. To let her know that’s where I was and for her to come see me there. Even my Mother, who was realizing my love for this cat, sat with me on the steps to give her head a rub and even told her to come visit us often. I tell ya, cats are NOT dumb. She went away for a few hours and then came right back.

There was even a day I went for a walk to go say hello to a few acquaintances and FeaBee just happened to be crossing the road. I called to her and she stopped dead in her tracks, looked towards me, and realizing that it was me, started a little trot and made little short sounding meows as she came towards me. I lifted her up and gave her some rubs, even though she wanted to be put back down but, gladly accepted being pet, I knew from that moment when she stopped, saw that it was me calling her, and came meowing towards me, I knew that she was meant to be my cat. And I believe that that was the day that she adopted me. 

The “project’s” management and owner(s) were finally going to try and do something about the stray cat problem; Try and find homes for all the cats. I asked my Mother again if I could adopt her and like usual she said no. So, with a heavy heart, I had FeaBee follow my down to the first building, where the Management Office was, and showed the woman working there, (my) Precious FeaBee. The lady gave her a look over and thanked me for pointing out the cat for her. All the while, I believe she was reading the sadness in my eyes. She even questioned the fact that she followed me there and I think the thought of, “the cat loves you,” went threw her mind. After going back to the apartment with FeaBee close behind me, I sat on my porch and cried. That night my Mother told me that she was thinking about letting me adopt her.

On one day in November, after coming home from getting coffee with my mother from a local coffee shop, the weather went from chilly to down right cold. It was raining and sleeting badly. Like I’ve never seen before. FeaBee was taking refuge from the storm on our porch. I remember looking over to my Mother who was doing some cleaning around the apartment. I asked her if she made any final decisions on me adopting FeaBee. Her answer made me want to jump out of my skin with excitement. She told me she wanted to wait a few more days before we let her in. Of course, with my concern for her being out in the weather, I said something to the affect of, “But, it’s raining and sleeting out there. And it’s way cold. She has to be freezing out there.” My Mother then broke down and told me to bring her on in.

  The joy that burst threw my heart was beyond expression. I opened the door and called FeaBee in. For a Feline to sit there for a few split seconds and look at me as if questioning my seriousness would be enough to split any human’s heart wide open. Then, she sprinted inside and stopped at my feet. I closed the door and rubbed her head and scratched her back, welcoming her home.

(FeaBee a few years after I adopted her.)

tumblrbot asked: WHAT MAKES YOU FEEL BETTER WHEN YOU ARE IN A BAD MOOD?

Playing my guitar, being around good friends, and/or having my cats by my side. 

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